Categories
Female Health Food Food Habits Health Nutrition

Guide to a Healthy Pregnancy

What is pregnancy:

Pregnancy is the period during which a fetus develops inside a woman’s womb or uterus. Pregnancy usually lasts about 40 weeks, or a little over 9 months, from the last menstrual cycle through delivery. The three stages of pregnancy are referred to as trimesters by doctors.

First trimester (week 1 to week 12)

The first step toward pregnancy is conception, which occurs when a sperm penetrates an egg. Through the woman’s fallopian tube, the fertilized egg (called a zygote) goes to the uterus and implants itself in the uterine wall. A zygote is a group of cells that will develop into the fetus and placenta. The placenta connects the mother and the fetus, providing nourishment and oxygen to the latter.

Second trimester (week 13 to week 28)

  • You can normally find out your baby’s sex between the ages of 18 and 20, which is when ultrasounds are used to search for birth defects.
  • At 20 weeks, a woman may begin to feel movement.
  • The fetus has left imprints and fingerprints after 24 weeks, and it sleeps and wakes on a regular basis.

According to the US National Institute of Child Health and Human Development’s Neonatal Research Network, babies born at 28 weeks have a 92 percent chance of surviving, although those born at this time are more likely to have serious health issues such as respiratory and brain problems.

Third trimester (week 29 to week 40)

  • At 32 weeks, the bones are soft and nearly fully formed, and the eyes can open and close; preterm babies are those born before 37 weeks. Developmental delays, visual and hearing problems, and cerebral palsy are more common in these children. Babies born between 34 and 36 weeks of pregnancy are referred to as “late preterm.”
  • “Early term” refers to babies born in the 37th and 38th weeks of pregnancy, which were formerly considered term. These newborns are more likely to have health issues than those born at 39 weeks or later, which is currently considered full term.
  • Babies delivered at 39 or 40 weeks of pregnancy are considered full-term. Full-term infants have better health outcomes.

Nutrition during pregnancy:

The body goes through a lot of physical and chemical changes throughout pregnancy. To keep yourself and your growing child fueled, you’ll need to eat well from a variety of sources. Eating a well-balanced, healthy diet can make you feel good and provide you and your child with all you need. It’s critical that you obtain all of the vitamins and minerals you need because the food you eat is your baby’s primary source of nutrition.

Because you’re feeding a whole new person, your body’s nutritional needs increase throughout pregnancy. Although the old adage “eating for two” isn’t entirely accurate, you and your baby will undoubtedly need more vitamins and macronutrients.

Micronutrients are vitamins and minerals that are only required in trace amounts in the diet.

Macronutrients are nutrients that provide calories, or energy. We’re talking carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. You’ll need to eat more of each type of nutrient during pregnancy.

Carbohydrates:

Carbohydrates meals help you feel satisfied without having too many calories and are a vital source of energy, several vitamins, and fiber. Bread, potatoes, breakfast cereals, rice, pasta, noodles, maize, millet, oats, yams, and cornmeal are some of the items on the list. Choose oven chips that are reduced in salt and fat if you’re having chips.

Over a third of your diet should consist of these foods. Choose wholegrain or higher-fiber alternatives like whole-wheat pasta, brown rice, or just leaving the skins on potatoes instead of refined starchy (white) foods.

Protein:

Protein is required for the growth of a baby’s tissues and organs, including the brain. During pregnancy, it also assists in the development of breast and uterine tissue. It even helps to boost your blood supply, allowing you to give your child more blood. Your protein needs increase with each trimester of pregnancy. Protein consumption during pregnancy should be much higher than current recommendations. You’ll need 70 to 100 grams of protein each day, depending on your weight and trimester.

Fats:

While it is true that some fats have negative health effects, others serve as a vital source of energy and aid in the body’s assimilation of specific nutrients. They can also supply essential fatty acids, which are necessary for the growth of your unborn child during pregnancy but which your body cannot produce.

Unsaturated fat called DHA is crucial for a baby’s brain and eye development. Aim for 200 mg of DHA per day for pregnant women. DHA is found in oily seafood like salmon and tuna.

Nutrient requirements during pregnancy:

Nutrient

Recommended        daily amount of intake

Sources:

Proteins

70 grams

Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy products, legumes, and nuts.

Calcium

1200 milligrams

Dairy products, leafy green vegetables, orange juice, and almonds

Iron

30 milligrams

Meat, fish, poultry, cereals, whole grain breads, legumes, leafy green vegetables, dried peaches, apricots and raisins.

Folacin (Folic Acid)

600 micrograms

Leafy green vegetables, legumes, whole grains, orange juice, asparagus.

Pyridoxine (B6)

1.9 milligrams

Wheat germ, meat, whole grains, cauliflower, bananas, avocados, peanuts, sunflower seeds, soybeans, and corn.

Zinc

15 milligrams

The same foods that contain iron, in addition to oysters, wheat germ and brown rice.

  • Vitamin (A): Pregnant women need 770 micrograms of vitamin (A) per day.
  • Vitamin (C): The recommended daily amount of vitamin C during pregnancy increases to 85 milligrams
  • Vitamin (D): All individuals under the age of 70, including pregnant women and breastfeeding women, need 600 IUs per day

Fluid intake during pregnancy:

In addition to the fluids in juices and soups, you can get enough fluids by consuming several glasses of water each day. Discuss limiting your use of artificial sweeteners and caffeine with your healthcare provider.

Foods to eat:

  • Proteins: Lean meat (chicken, fish, lentils, etc.) is advised as a daily source of protein.
  • Carbohydrates are a type of carbohydrate that may be found in a variety of foods (such as bread, cereals, potatoes, rice, and pasta).
  • Obtaining fat from plant sources (such as olive oil) is preferred over saturated fats obtained from animal sources (like butter).
  • Dairy products that have been pasteurized: (such as Yogurt, milk, and cheese).
  • Vitamins and minerals are essential for good health.
  • There’s a lot of fiber in this.

Foods to avoid:

  • alcohol
  • excessive caffeine
  • raw meats and seafood
  • high-mercury fish
  • uncooked processed meats
  • unpasteurized dairy

Dietary supplements:

Good dietary supplements:

  • Iron: To prevent iron deficiency anemia in the mother and to aid in the transmission of more blood to the fetus so that it receives the most oxygen possible.
  • Folic acid is used to prevent the development of spina bifida in the fetus.

Harmful dietary supplements:

  • Vitamin A supplementation, whether in food or tablet form, should be avoided during pregnancy since it can harm the fetus.
  • Dietary supplements are insufficient to replace a nutritious diet.

How to overcome cravings and food aversions during pregnancy?

When you’re pregnant, you can develop an aversion to certain foods, which means you won’t like the smell or taste of them. Food cravings for one or more foods may also arise.

Pregnancy cravings

A hunger for a donut, Chinese food, or an unexpected culinary combo like pickles and ice cream can strike. It’s unclear why pregnant women have dietary aversions or urge. Hormones, on the other hand, are thought to play a part. It’s fine to indulge your cravings now and then, especially if they’re for foods that are part of a healthy diet. However, you should try to limit your intake of junk food and processed foods.

Pregnancy aversions

Food aversions, on the other hand, may only be a problem if they involve meals that are necessary for a baby’s development.

Pica

Pica is a disorder in which you have a desire for unhealthy meals. Pregnant women with pica may want to eat clay, cigarette ashes, or starch, among other strange foods. Pica during pregnancy could be a sign of a vitamin or mineral shortage.

Dn.Sadia Fatima is Director and Co-Founder of SDNO. She is a great nutrition entrepreneur and leader. Her actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more. She can be reached at @nutracare21_.

Disclaimer: The information in this article is not intended as sound medical advice for your particular illness; rather, it is meant to increase awareness of common health issues. Before implementing any recommendations made in this article or choosing a treatment plan based on its contents, you should always speak with a qualified healthcare professional.

Sharing is caring
Categories
Disease Female Health Health Nutrition

An Unconventional Guide to PCOS

PCOS stands for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. PCOS is a hormonal disorder that affects women during their reproductive years (ages 15 to 44). PCOS is a condition that affects a woman’s ovaries, which are reproductive organs that generate estrogen and progesterone, which regulate the menstrual cycle. Normally, the male hormones termed androgens are also produced in modest amounts by the ovaries. The ovaries produce eggs that are fertilized by sperm from a man. In short, the polycystic ovarian syndrome is characterized by:

  • cysts in the ovaries
  • high levels of male hormones
  • irregular or skipped periods

Many tiny, fluid-filled sacs form inside the ovaries as a result of PCOS. The term “polycystic” refers to a person who has a lot of cysts. Each of these sacs is a follicle, which contains an immature egg. Ovulation is never triggered because the eggs are never developed enough. Ovulation deficiency affects estrogen, progesterone, FSH, and LH level. The levels of progesterone are lower than typical, while the levels of androgen are higher than usual. Extra male hormones cause the menstrual cycle to be disrupted, resulting in fewer cycles for women with PCOS.

Causes of PCOS

  • Excess insulin is a problem. Insulin is a hormone generated by the pancreas that helps cells to consume sugar, which is your body’s main source of energy. Your blood sugar levels may rise and your body may create more insulin if your cells grow resistant to the effects of insulin. Excess insulin may boost testosterone production, making ovulation problematic.
  • Low-grade inflammation. Inflammation at a low level. The synthesis of chemicals by white blood cells to fight infection is referred to as this phrase. Women with PCOS have a form of low-grade inflammation that causes their polycystic ovaries to create androgens, which can cause heart and blood vessel problems, according to research.
  • Excess androgen. Hirsutism and acne are caused by unusually high quantities of androgen produced by the ovaries.

Common symptoms of PCOS

  • Irregular periods. The uterine lining is not shed every month due to a lack of ovulation. PCOS causes some women to have fewer than eight periods per year, or none at all.
  • Heavy bleeding. Because the uterine lining develops over a longer length of time, your periods may be heavier than usual.
  • Hair growth. Hair grows on the face and body of more than 70% of women with this disorder, including the back, belly, and chest. Hirsutism is the term for excessive hair growth.
  • Acne. Male hormones can induce breakouts on the face, chest, and upper back by making the skin oilier than usual.
  • Weight gain. Up to 80 percent of women with PCOS are overweight or have obesity.
  • Male pattern baldness. Hair on the scalp gets thinner and may fall out.
  • Darkening of the skin. In bodily creases such as the neck, groin, and under the breasts, dark patches of skin can appear.
  • Hormone changes can trigger headaches in some women

Complications of PCOS

  • Infertility
  • Gestational diabetes or pregnancy-induced high blood pressure
  • Miscarriage or premature birth
  • Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis — a severe liver inflammation caused by fat accumulation in the liver
  • Metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions including high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that significantly increase your risk of cardiovascular disease
  • Type 2 diabetes or prediabetes
  • Sleep apnea
  • Depression, anxiety and eating disorders
  • Abnormal uterine bleeding
  • Cancer of the uterine lining (endometrial cancer)

Dietary and lifestyle tips to treat PCOS

  • Infertility
  • Gestational diabetes or pregnancy-induced high blood pressure
  • Miscarriage or premature birth
  • Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis — a severe liver inflammation caused by fat accumulation in the liver
  • Metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions including high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that significantly increase your risk of cardiovascular disease
  • Type 2 diabetes or prediabetes
  • Sleep apnea
  • Depression, anxiety and eating disorders
  • Abnormal uterine bleeding
  • Cancer of the uterine lining (endometrial cancer)

Dietary and lifestyle tips to treat PCOS

PCOS treatment usually begins with a change in lifestyle, such as weight loss, nutrition, and exercise.

Losing just 5 to 10% of your body weight can help regulate your menstrual cycle and alleviate the symptoms of PCOS. Weight loss can also:

  • improve cholesterol levels
  • lower insulin
  • reduce heart disease and diabetes risks

Any diet that aids in weight loss can aid in the treatment of your disease. Some diets, on the other hand, may have advantages over others.

  • Low carbohydrate diets are helpful for both weight loss and reducing insulin levels, according to studies comparing PCOS diets.
  • A low glycemic index (low GI) diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains regulates the menstrual cycle better than a traditional weight-loss diet.
  • Women with PCOS can reduce weight by doing 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise at least three times a week, according to a few studies. Exercise-induced weight loss enhances ovulation and insulin levels.
  • When exercise is combined with a balanced diet, it is even more helpful. Diet with exercise aids weight loss more effectively than either intervention alone.

Process of Seed Cycling:

Seed cycling, often known as a seed rotation diet, is a natural remedy for balancing women’s hormones. It is thought to be particularly useful in the treatment of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome(PCOS) and irregular menstruation cycles.

It is actually used to remedy infertility and symptoms like hot flashes, fatigue, etc. However, there is no scientific proof or approval to back this up.

Women must consume 2 tablespoons of seeds such as pumpkin, flax, chia, sunflower, and sesame seeds when using the seeds cycling method. These seeds have hormone-regulatory qualities and can aid in the body’s maintenance of oestrogen and progesterone levels.

Raw and freshly ground seeds are ideal. You may also include them into other foods, such as oatmeal, milkshakes or cornflakes.

Foods to Eat and Avoid:

Food to Eat:Food to avoid:

High-fiber fruits and vegetables (apples, plums, broccoli, cauliflower)

Leafy greens

Root veggies

Red berries and grapes

Beans, legumes, lentils

Whole-grain or multigrain bread, crackers, pasta, tortillas

Brown rice, quinoa

Oats, rye, barley

Flax, chia, and sunflower seeds

Cottage cheese

Lean chicken or turkey (without the skin)

Fatty fish (salmon, tuna)

Veggie burgers

Eggs, egg whites, egg substitutes

Low-fat and Greek yogurt

Non-dairy milk alternatives (almond, rice)

Avocado

Hummus

Coconut and coconut oil

Nuts and nut butters

Olive oil, flax seed oil

Fresh herbs and spices (turmeric, cinnamon, ginger)

Dark chocolate (in moderation)

Green tea

Bread, baked goods, crackers, pasta, and cereals made from refined white flour

Starchy vegetables (white potatoes, corn, peas)

White rice

Red meat

Full-fat dairy

Processed meat (lunch meat, hot dogs, sausage, bacon)

Fried food, fast food

Potato chips, microwave popcorn, salted pretzels

Dried fruit

Packaged snack foods

Frozen meals and snacks

Artificial sweeteners

Granola, cereal bars

Margarine, shortening, lard

Instant noodles, packaged pasta/soup mix

Bouillon cubes, broth, stock

Commercial salad dressing, marinades, seasonings

Milk/chocolate, candy

Ice cream, pudding, custard

Pastries, cake, cookies, pies

Soda

Sugary fruit juice

Energy drinks

Gluten and wheat

Soy products (tofu, soy milk)

Medical treatment

Birth control pills and other drugs can help treat PCOS symptoms like hair growth and acne by regulating the menstrual period and regulating the menstrual cycle.

Birth control

Taking progestin daily can:

  • restore a normal hormone balance
  • regulate ovulation
  • relieve symptoms like excess hair growth
  • protect against endometrial cancer. These hormones come in a pill, patch, or vaginal ring.

Metformin

Metformin (Glucophage, Fortamet) is a type 2 diabetes medication. It also aids in the treatment of PCOS by lowering insulin levels. Metformin, when combined with dietary and activity adjustments, promotes weight reduction, reduces blood sugar, and restores a normal menstrual cycle better than diet and exercise alone, according to one study.

Clomiphene

Clomiphene (Clomid) is a fertility drug that can help women with PCOS get pregnant. It’s important to note that, as you’re discussing family planning, to keep in mind that clomiphene increases the chances for twins and other multiple births.

Surgery

If alternative therapies fail to increase fertility, surgery may be a possibility. Ovarian drilling is a technique that uses a laser or a thin heated needle to create microscopic holes in the ovary to restore regular ovulation.

Dn.Sadia Fatima is Director and Co-Founder of SDNO. She is a great nutrition entrepreneur and leader. Her actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more. She can be reached at @nutracare21_.

Disclaimer: The information in this article is not intended as sound medical advice for your particular illness; rather, it is meant to increase awareness of common health issues. Before implementing any recommendations made in this article or choosing a treatment plan based on its contents, you should always speak with a qualified healthcare professional.

Sharing is caring
Categories
Health Disease Female Health Knowledge Nutrition

The complete beginner’s guide to Pre-Menstrual Syndrome

Menstrual cycle is a normal phase which every female has to face during her days of puberty. This cycle holds great significance as it is associated with the release of various hormones in female body and for well-being. There is a term called as Pre-menstrual cycle or syndrome which we often hear but only a few of us are aware with the actual meaning of this word.

PMS stands for Pre-menstrual syndrome and includes a series of physical and emotional symptoms which women feel before the start of their menstrual period and after ovulation. Such symptoms are usually seen after the days of ovulation due to the drastic fall in estrogen and progesterone levels and go away within a few days when women’s menstruates. The signs are mild in some women while in some cases, the symptoms are so severe that the daily activities are disrupted.

 

Pre-menstrual syndrome holding a series of various symptoms are often seen in women who:

  • Have high level of stress due to various factors
  • Have a family history of depression and other non-communicable diseases
  • Have a history of postpartum depression

Symptoms of Pre-Menstrual syndrome

Women often ask that when do PMS symptoms start. Sometimes there are PMS symptoms but no period. There are potential signs and symptoms that indicates the presence of pre-menstrual syndrome faced by women of various age groups who menstruate each month.

Behavioral signs and symptoms

Physical signs and symptoms

Anxiety

Muscle or joint pain

Depressed mood

Headache

Mood swings

Fatigue

Irritability

Weight gain or fluid retention

Sudden episodes of anger

 

Sudden food cravings

Bloating in abdominal region

Insomnia

Breast tenderness

Social withdrawal

Acne or break outs on face

Poor concentration

Constipation or Diarrhea

Change in libido

Alcoholic Intolerance

 

Causes of Pre-menstrual syndrome

Scientific researches have concluded that there are no specific causes of PMS or severe PMS disorder. People experience the symptoms in a more severe way and here are a few theories suggested for you which are considered as causes of pre-menstrual symptoms.

  1. Hormonal changes

Experts suggests that PMS is a response to changing levels of hormones in body. The major hormones involved are estrogen and progesterone that naturally fluctuate throughout the menses cycle. Hormones reach a specific peak and then rapidly decline during the luteal phase followed by ovulation. It leads to anxiety, irritability and changes in mood.

  1. Chemical changes in the brain

Chemical messengers are also a factor of symptoms of PMS. The neurotransmitters called as serotonin and norepinephrine are important for bodily functions. They help to regulate mood, emotions and behavior. A sudden drop in estrogen leads to release of norepinephrine. It leads to decline in production of dopamine, acetylcholine and serotonin. Such changes eventually triggers sleep problems leading to low or depressed mood changes.

  1. Lifestyle factors

Our lifestyle plays a significant role in maintaining our overall health. Potential lifestyle factors can worsen the PMS symptoms leading to irregular menses. The factors worsening the condition are:

  • Smoking
  • Eating lots of high fat food
  • Consuming excessive sugar and salt
  • Lack of quality sleep

PMS affecting other health problems

Due to lack of awareness, majority of the women are not able to detect the pre-menstrual symptoms. There is a need to normalize the concept of premenstrual syndrome meaning in Urdu. There are many other health problems which gets worse before the menstrual period starts. These health problems has association with PMS including:

Depression and anxiety disorders

These are the common conditions that overlap with PMS. Depression and anxiety symptoms get worse before the menstrual period starts.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome

Women suffering from ME/CFS are more likely to have heavy menstrual bleeding, premature menopause or no menses at all.

Irritable bowel syndrome

IBS can lead to cramping, bloating and abdominal gas. These symptoms get worse before the period starts.

Bladder pain syndrome

Women who suffer from bladder pain syndrome have painful cramps during PMS.

Methods to ease the symptoms of PMS

There is a cure to every problem and so is the case with Pre-menstrual syndrome. The symptoms of PMS can be slowed down by adopting the following methods:

  • It is recommended to drink plenty of fluids for easing the abdominal bloating. You can consume herbal teas including chamomile or red raspberry leaf that may ease cramping.
  • Try to consume an overall balanced diet including all five servings of food groups. Focus on the intake of whole grains, fruits and vegetables.
  • Cut back on the items like sugar, salt, excessive caffeine and alcohol which can trigger the symptoms.
  • You can seek help from healthcare professional in case of excessive cramps and mood symptoms. You can try supplements like folic acid, vitamin B-6, calcium and magnesium.
  • It is recommended to get more vitamin D in the form of natural light, food or through supplements.
  • Try to get maximum sleep of 7 to 9 hours each night to help relieve fatigue and overall health.
  • Try at least half an hour of physical activity on daily basis. It is necessary to help relieve bloating and cramping and also lessens the anxiety and depression symptoms.

Diet related suggestions

A healthy diet plays a major role in overall well-being of a person. A balanced diet can cure all sort of symptoms associated with PMS too. Good food leads to good mood so here are few suggestions which can be adopted to lessen the PMS symptoms.

  1. Intake of high-quality calcium foods

According to studies, it has been seen that women who consume the highest intakes of calcium and vitamin D are less likely to develop PMS. It is recommended to consume calcium at about 1200 milligrams per day. RDA for women of age group 19-50 years should consume 1000 mg. RDA for women below 70 years regarding vitamin D consumption is 700 IU and above 70 years is 600 IU.

Calcium works in the brain to relieve some depression symptoms while vitamin D influences emotional changes. Calcium and vitamin D can be consumed through diet from various dietary sources such as:

  • Low-fat milk
  • Cheese
  • Yogurt
  • Fortified orange juice
  • Soy milk
  • Salmon
  • Fortified milk

 

  1. Don’t skip breakfast

It is recommended to never skip breakfast in any means. Try to consume regular meals and snacks throughout the day. It is beneficial to start the day with breakfast as it has various benefits. PMS includes a hormone storm and can affect the appetite of person. The mood becomes more irritable when a person skips meals and leads to rise in blood sugar levels.

  1. Consume whole grains, lean protein, fruits, and vegetables

Eating a nutrient rich and balanced diet can prevent the person from various health problems. It is a better approach to eat well to tweak the symptoms of PMS. Try to include plenty colorful and fiber-packed vegetables and fruits in your diet which are rich in antioxidants. Consume the maximum servings of whole grain foods like brown rice, oatmeal and rye bread to cure bloating.

It is also a good approach to consume Vitamin B-fortified breads and cereals. Researches have proven that higher intakes of thiamine and riboflavin can lower the risk of PMS. But the source should be through diet, not from the supplements. Initiate complex carbohydrates in diet which can help to stabilize your mood and keeps the cravings under control. Complex carbohydrates include lentils, potatoes and unprocessed oats providing the feeling of fullness and moderately rises insulin levels.

Focus on consuming iron-rich foods from lean meat sources to avoid anemia. Iron-rich foods are necessary to avoid any sort of anemic problem as heavy menstrual bleeding can lead to loss of blood in female body. Don’t forget to remove the excess fat from the meat sources. If you are a vegan, then you can ask your doctor for an iron supplement too in order to avoid iron deficiency.

  1. Don’t overload on sugar items

Cravings for sugar is a common issue faced by females showing symptoms of PMS and is difficult to resist it. It is due to the shifting levels of estrogen and progesterone hormones and can also decrease the serotonin levels in brain. All these changes trigger the PMS symptoms and affect’s the mood in a woman. Studies have shown that a women with PMS should consume extra 200-500 calories per day. But, in our daily life those extra calories come from sweet foods and fats. It is advisable to consume whole grains instead of sugars to boost the serotonin levels.

To avoid sugar cravings, you can snack on nuts which are rich in omega-3 fatty acids and provide the feeling of fullness in body. There are variety of nuts like pecans, walnuts, almonds and hazelnuts. A person should munch on healthier sources of snacks instead of sugary items to avoid inconvenience in health.

Medications

There are some prescription medicines and over-the counter pain relievers that can help to treat some PMS symptoms.

  • Over-the-counter pain relievers

These are available on almost all sort of medical stores which help to lessen physical symptoms like cramps, headaches, backaches and breast tenderness. These pain relievers include:

  • Naproxen
  • Aspirin
  • Ibuprofen

 

  • Prescription medicines

You can also seek help from prescription medicines, if in case over-the-counter medicines are not working. These includes:

Antidepressants: These can help to relive emotional symptoms of PMS in some women where other medicines are not working. SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) are the common type of antidepressants used to treat the symptoms of PMS.

Diuretics: They are also called as water pills and helps to reduce the symptoms of bloating and breast tenderness.

Anti-anxiety medicines: These may help to reduce the feelings of anxiousness.

It is recommended to consult your doctor before taking any sort of medicine as they can have side effects too. Avoid taking any sort of medication without prescription.

Supplements and vitamins

Vitamins and minerals also help to relieve the symptoms of PMS. FDA does not regulates vitamin and minerals or any sort of herbal supplements like they regulate medicines. It is recommended to talk to your doctor before taking any sort of supplement.

Here we will discuss some benefits of vitamins and minerals which help to ease the symptoms of PMS.

  1. Calcium:Calcium is a mineral found in foods such as milk, cheese, yogurt and other dairy products. It helps to reduce some PMS symptoms including fatigue, cravings and depression. There are also some fortified cereals, breads and orange juices available in market which have calcium added in them. These items can also be implemented in diet instead of a calcium supplement.
  2. Vitamin B6:This vitamin may also help to treat the PMS symptoms including moodiness, irritability, forgetfulness, bloating and anxiety. Vitamin B6 is found in various food items like fish, poultry, potatoes and fruits excluding citrus fruits and fortified cereals.
  3. Magnesium:It helps to relieve some symptoms of PMS including migraines. Magnesium is rich in green leafy vegetables such as spinach, nuts, whole grains and fortified cereals. It can also be taken as a supplement.
  4. Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids:Polyunsaturated fatty acids help to reduce cramps and other PMS symptoms. Flaxseeds, nuts, fish and green leafy vegetables are some good sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Related questions

What syndrome is common before the period starts? PMS known as pre-menstrual syndrome is a combination of syndrome seen before the start of menstrual cycle in women. The symptoms include bloating, headaches, and moodiness.

How long does the PMS lasts in a women? PMS called as pre-menstrual syndrome lasts for about 2-3 days after the period begins. The symptoms are worse during the starting days of period. Certain body changes and mood changes are seen during this phase.

Why does a female feel crazy before her period? Low levels of serotonin causes the feelings of sadness and irritability. This neurotransmitter helps to regulate the mood, sleep cycle and appetite in a person.

What are signs which indicate that date of menstrual cycle is near? There are some signs which indicate that period is coming which includes:

  • Soreness or heaviness in breasts
  • Break outs on face
  • Tiredness and cramps
  • Constipation or diarrhea
  • Bloating
  • Headache and mood swings

Why does females get anxiety before a week of their period? The rollercoaster of hormones affects the neurotransmitters in brain such as serotonin and dopamine. These are associated with mood regulation and leads to increase in symptoms such as anxiety, depression and mood swings.

How can a female balance her hormones before the period starts? Hormones can be balanced during and before the start of periods through the following means:

  • Get enough sleep
  • Exercise regularly
  • Eat complex carbohydrates, proteins and healthy fats
  • Drink a lot of water

Dn.Zainab Naeem is Hosting and Content Writing Head of SDNO. She is a freelance nutritionist and writer, and also a self-taught calligrapher, artist and chef.  She can be reached at @xayni_de_artista.

Disclaimer: The information in this article is not intended as sound medical advice for your particular illness; rather, it is meant to increase awareness of common health issues. Before implementing any recommendations made in this article or choosing a treatment plan based on its contents, you should always speak with a qualified healthcare professional.

Sharing is caring